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ACUE Bibliography

The Essentials of College Instruction ACUE’s Course in Effective Teaching Practices A Comprehensive Bibliography

Unit 1 - Designing an Effective Course and Class

Module 1a. Establishing Powerful Learning Outcomes

In this module, faculty learn how to write course learning outcomes that effectively define what students will know and be able to do at the end of a course. The module introduces a set of steps for writing outcomes that are student centered, actionable, specific, sequenced from foundational to more complex, and aligned—when appropriate—to program, department, and institutional outcomes.

To satisfy the module requirements, practicing faculty must apply the recommended techniques to write new learning outcomes or revise their existing learning outcomes.

Advising Subject Matter Expert: Thomas A. Angelo, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Anderson, L. W. (Ed.), Krathwohl, D. R. (Ed.), Airasian, P. W., Cruikshank, K. A., Mayer, R. E., Pintrich, P. R., Wittrock, M. C. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives (Complete ed.). New York, NY: Longman.

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. American Association of Higher Education Bulletin, 39(7), 3–7.

Fink, L. D. (2013). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Harrow, A. J. (1972). A taxonomy of psychomotor domain: A guide for developing behavioral objectives. New York, NY: McKay.

Krathwohl, D. R., Bloom, B. S., & Masia, B. B. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educational goals. Handbook II: Affective domain. New York, NY: McKay.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Twigg, C. A. (2003). Improving learning and reducing costs: New models for online learning. EDUCAUSE Review, 38(5), 28–38. N/A

Module 1b. Aligning Assessments With Course Outcomes

In this module, faculty learn how to design assessments that most effectively and efficiently allow students to demonstrate mastery of course outcomes. In addition, the module includes techniques to help students prepare to meet assessment expectations.

To satisfy the module requirements, practicing faculty must apply at least one technique, such as revising a course assessment based on the cognitive levels of applicable learning outcomes, developing an assessment blueprint, or creating a course assessment plan.

Advising Subject Matter Expert: Thomas A. Angelo, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. White Plains, NY: Longman.

Angelo, T. A. (1995). Improving classroom assessment to improve learning. Assessment Update, 7(6), 1–2, 13–14. N/A

Angelo, T. A. (2012). Designing subjects for learning: Practical, research-based principles and guidelines. In L. Hunt & D. Chalmers (Eds.), University teaching in focus: A learning-centred approach (pp. 93–111). Melbourne, Australia: ACER Press.

Biggs, J. B., & Tang, C. S-k. (2007). Teaching for quality learning at university (3rd ed.). Maidenhead, UK: Open University Press.

Brown, S., & Race, P. (2012). Using effective assessment to promote learning. In L. Hunt & D. Chalmers (Eds.), University teaching in focus: A learning-centred approach (pp. 74–91). Melbourne, Australia: ACER Press.

Carnegie Mellon University, Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation. (n.d.). Whys and hows of assessment. Retrieved from https://www.cmu.edu/teaching/assessment/basics /index.html

International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education. (2014). Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives and writing intended learning outcomes statements. Retrieved from http://iacbe.org/pdf/blooms-taxonomy.pdf James, R., & McInnis, C. (2001). Strategically re-positioning student assessment: A discussion paper on assessment of student learning in universities. Centre for the Study of Higher Education, The University of Melbourne. Retrieved from http://melbourne-cshe.unimelb.edu.au

Kan, C. K. (2010, August). Using test blueprint in classroom assessment: Why and how. Paper presented at the

36th International Association for Educational Assessment (IAEA) Annual Conference, Bangkok,

Thailand. Retrieved from http://www.academia.edu/305404/Using_test_blueprint_in_classroom _assessments_why_and_how

Myers, C. B., & Myers, S. M. (2007). Assessing assessment: The effects of two exam formats on course achievement and evaluation. Innovative Higher Education, 31, 227–236.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

O’Brien, K. (2010, October 3). The test has been canceled: Final exams are quietly vanishing from college. The Boston Globe. Retrieved from http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2010/10/03 /the_test_has_been_canceled/

Popham, W. J. (2003). Test better, teach better: The instructional role of assessment. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Reiner, C. M., Bothell, T. W., Sudweeks, R. R., & Wood, B. (2002). How to prepare effective essay questions:

Guidelines for university faculty. Retrieved from http://www.uwgb.edu/oira/teachlearn/bettertests /betteressays.pdf

Stiggins, R. J. (1997). Student-centered classroom assessment (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill.

Suskie, L. (2009). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Twigg, C. A. (2003). Improving learning and reducing costs: New models for online learning. EDUCAUSE Review, 38(5), 28–38. N/A

Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (expanded 2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Module 1c. Aligning Activities and Assignments With Course Outcomes

In this module, faculty learn how to select activities and assignments that are aligned to the cognitive levels of their learning outcomes, prepare for in- and out-of-class time, and design transparent assignments.

To satisfy the module requirements, practicing faculty must develop or revise a course activity or assignment aligned to course outcomes and designed to help students better attain those outcomes.

Advising Subject Matter Experts: Mary-Ann Winkelmes, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and Thomas A. Angelo, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., Norman, M. K. (2010). How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. White Plains, NY: Longman.

Angelo, T. A. (2012). Designing subjects for learning: Practical, research-based principles and guidelines. In L. Hunt & D. Chalmers (Eds.), University teaching in focus: A learning-centred approach (pp. 93–111). Melbourne, Australia: ACER Press.

Biggs, J. B., & Tang, C. S-k. (2007). Teaching for quality learning at university (3rd ed.). Maidenhead, UK: Open University Press.

Biggs, J. B., & Tang, C. S-k. (2011). Teaching for quality learning at university: What the student does (4th ed.). Maidenhead, England: McGraw-Hill/Society for Research into Higher Education/Open University Press.

Bok, D. C. (2006). Our underachieving colleges: A candid look at how much students learn and why they should be learning more. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Head, A., & Hostetler, K. (2015, September 2). Mary-Ann Winkelmes: Transparency in teaching and learning.

Retrieved from http://projectinfolit.org/smart-talks/item/149-mary-ann -winkelmes-smart-talk

Jones, E. A., Hoffman, S., Moore, L. M., Ratcliff, G., Tibbetts, S., Click, B. A. L., III, . . . The Pennsylvania State University. (1995). National assessment of college student learning: Identifying college graduates; essential skills in writing, speech and listening, and critical thinking (ED383255). Retrieved from http://files.eric. ed.gov/fulltext/ED383255.pdf

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Staley, C. C. (2003). 50 ways to leave your lectern: Active learning strategies to engage first-year students. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.

Svinicki, M. D., & McKeachie, W. J. (2014). McKeachie’s teaching tips: Strategies, research, and theory for college and university teachers (14th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Twigg, C. A. (2003). Improving learning and reducing costs: New models for online learning. EDUCAUSE Review, 38(5), 28–38. N/A

Walvoord, B. E., & Anderson, V. J. (2009). Effective grading: A tool for learning and assessment in college (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Wieman, C. (2016). Observation guide for active-learning classroom. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science

Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: http://www

.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Active-learning-class-observation-guide_Wieman.pdf

Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (expanded 2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Module 1d. Preparing an Effective Syllabus

In this module, faculty learn how to design a syllabus that both communicates essential information and facilitates student success. The module includes a checklist and guiding questions instructors can use to identify essential items and important resources. Instructors learn how to design calendars to assist students in meeting key deliverables and build a graphic or big ideas syllabus to support students in visualizing the organization of the course.

To satisfy the module requirements, practicing faculty must apply at least one technique, such as using a checklist and guiding questions to revise their syllabus or creating their own graphic or big ideas syllabus.

Advising Subject Matter Expert: Linda Nilson, Clemson University (retired)

Appleby, D. C. (1994). How to improve your teaching with the course syllabus. Observer, 7(3).

Barkley, E. F., Cross, K. P., & Major, C. H. (2005). Collaborative learning techniques: A handbook for college faculty. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Chapman, S. (n.d.). Getting students to read the class syllabus. Retrieved from http://teaching.colostate.edu/ tips/tip.cfm?tipid=50

Clark, C. (2014, August 26). Turn your syllabus into an infographic [Blog post]. Retrieved from https:/ltlatnd.

wordpress.com/2014/08/26/turn-your-syllabus-into-an-infographic/

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Grunert O’Brien, J. (1997). The course syllabus: A learning-centered approach. Bolton, MA: Anker.

Grunert O’Brien, J., Millis, B. J., & Cohen, M. W. (2008). The course syllabus: A learning-centered approach (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Guertin, L. (2014, August 27). Getting students to read the syllabus with a syllabus quiz [Blog post]. Retrieved from the American Geophysical Union website: http://blogs.agu.org/geoedtrek/2014/08/27/ syllabus-quiz/

Illinois State University. (n.d.). Description of objectives of 100-level PSY courses. Retrieved from http:// psychology.illinoisstate.edu/undergrad/objectives/100.shtml

Kaufmann, K. (2003). Building a learner centered syllabus. Retrieved from http://www.4faculty.org/Demo/ read2_main.htm

Moryl, R., & Foy, S. (2015). A graphic is worth a thousand words: Develop a graphic syllabus for your course [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from http://graphicsyllabus.blogs.emmanuel.edu/wp-content/ uploads/sites/13/2013/05/graphicSyllabus_PPT_PDF.pdf

Nilson, L. B. (2007). The graphic syllabus and the outcomes map: Communicating your course. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nilson, L. B. (in press). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Parkes, J., & Harris, M. B. (2002). The purposes of a syllabus. College Teaching, 50, 55–61.

Polk State College, Faculty Central. (n.d.). Creating a syllabus. Retrieved from http://polkfacultycentral.com/ syllabus-resources/

Riviere, J. (2014). Syllabus construction. Retrieved from http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/syllabusdesign/

Rutgers University, Center for Teaching Advancement and Assessment Research. (n.d.). Syllabus design.

Retrieved from https://ctaar.rutgers.edu/teaching/syllabus/

Sample, M. (2011, May 31). Planning a class with backward design [Blog post]. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/planning-a-class-with-backwarddesign/33625

Sinor, J., & Kaplan, M. Creating your syllabus. Retrieved from http://www.crlt.umich.edu/gsis/p2_1

Twigg, C. A. (2003). Improving learning and reducing costs: New models for online learning. EDUCAUSE Review, 38(5), 28–38. N/A

Wallace, D. F. (2014, November 10). David Foster Wallace’s mind-blowing creative nonfiction syllabus: “This

does not mean an essayist’s goal is to ‘share’ or ‘express herself’ or whatever feel-good term you got taught in high school.” Retrieved from http://www.salon.com/2014/11/10

/david_foster_wallaces_mind_blowing_creative_nonfiction_syllabus_this_does_not_mean_an

_essayist%E2%80%99s_goal_is_to_share_or_express_herself_or_whatever_feel_good_term_you

_got_taught_in_h/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=socialflow

Wieman, C. (2014). First day of class – recommendations for instructors. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science

Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca /resources/files/First_Day_of_Class.pdf

Wilson, S. (2006, April 21). Classroom realities. Insider Higher Ed. Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered

.com/views/2006/04/21/wilson

Module 1e. Planning an Effective Class Session

In this module, faculty learn how to effectively leverage each portion of a class session to positively impact student learning. The module includes techniques designed to begin class—the most critical learning time—with a powerful opening. Faculty also learn strategies to segment class sessions with student-active breaks and end by engaging students in summary activities.

To satisfy the module requirements, practicing faculty must apply the techniques to plan a class session with an effective start, middle, and end.

Advising Subject Matter Experts: Stephen Brookfield, University of St. Thomas, Minnesota, and Elizabeth

Barkley, Foothill College

Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Fuchs, A. H. (1997). Ebbinghaus’s contributions to psychology after 1885. American Journal of Psychology, 110, 621–634.

Gazzaniga, M. S., Ivry, R. B., & Mangun, G. R. (2002). Cognitive neuroscience: The biology of the mind (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Norton.

Lang, J. M. (2008). On course: A week-by-week guide to your first semester of college teaching. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Medina, J. (2014). Brain rules: 12 principles for surviving and thriving at work, home, and school (Updated and expanded 2nd ed.). Seattle, WA: Pear Press.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Sousa, D. A. (2011). How the brain learns (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Twigg, C. A. (2003). Improving learning and reducing costs: New models for online learning. EDUCAUSE Review, 38(5), 28–38. N/A

Wieman, C. (2016). Observation guide for active-learning classroom. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science

Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca

/resources/files/Active-learning-class-observation-guide_Wieman.pdf

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